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Frankly Speaking

Frankly Speaking

Every parent’s worst nightmare

It’s a nice enough Monday morning and I’m on duty in Athlone, and, as I’m trying to figure out what I’m going to write about, I find my thoughts, sadly, keep going back to Karen Buckley and her horrific murder in Glasgow at the hands of a very sick and twisted killer, Alexander Pacteau.

Now I’m aware that in the kind of world we live in, killings have almost become the norm and here in Ireland, especially in our Capital city, we seem to have a never-ending procession of gangland shootings, most of which have their origins in some kind of drug deals which for one reason or another have turned sour.

I suppose it’s human nature to become a little bit blasé about gangland killings, and to tell the truth I’ve heard people declare that the more gang members are done away with the better, but we should always remember there are families affected by each and every one of those killings – the victims will be someone’s son or daughter, brother, sister, father or mother, and there will inevitably be people left heartbroken and devastated by such heartless executions.

However, it is also true to say that most of the victims in drug-related shootings know the risks, and are willing to take their chances in pursuit of wealth and ill-gotten gains, whereas for poor Karen Buckley it was simply a case of being in the wrong place at the wrong time.

In a case which has a lot of similarity to the killing of Drogheda woman Jill Meagher in Melbourne two years ago, Karen left a Glasgow nightclub just to go home and fell into the clutches of the depraved Pacteau.

Now I won’t go into the gruesome details of Karen’s brutal murder, but as a parent, it was the heart-wrenching statement issued by her parents, John and Marian, that will live in my memory for as long as I’m on this earth.

“Our hearts are broken at the thought of Karen’s final moments on this world. The thought of her being alone, frightened and struggling for her life haunts us”.

Those words tell it all, and as they said, it was every parent’s worst nightmare, and I can only hope and pray they, somehow, find the strength to get over such a crushing and life-changing blow.

So proud of Galway

Changing the mood – normally I would be waxing lyrically (maybe that’s a bit of an exaggeration) about the amazing All-Ireland Hurling semi-final that the hurlers of Galway and Tipperary served up in Croke Park on Sunday afternoon.

The history books will tell us that Galway prevailed by a point but they will never be able to capture the heroism, manliness, brilliance and excitement of this epic encounter, and the sight of Galway manager Anthony Cunningham having a quiet word with Tipp’s Noel McGrath (who was back playing for his county after having testicular cancer) after the final whistle, was a particularly heart-warming moment.

In a frenetic encounter, apart from one or two flash-points, the sportsmanship on view was of the highest order, and if people were looking for a masterpiece to lighten up this year’s championship they certainly got it.

For Galway, it’s another crack at the Kilkenny Cats to look forward to, while Tipp will be left to reflect on narrowly losing yet another classic encounter.

As for me, I have to eat a large portion of humble pie, as after the Leinster Final when Anthony Cunningham told Brian Cody he’d see him again in September, I wrote that the only way he (Cunningham) would be in Croke Park on All-Ireland Final Day would be as a spectator.

Never in my life have I been as happy to be proved wrong, so Anthony, ‘well done’ – and here’s hoping you can lead the Tribesmen to the Holy Grail!

Recalling characters

Changing subjects entirely, and last Thursday night (or evening to be exact) myself and Carol, my long-suffering wife, headed off to the Abbey Hotel in Roscommon to treat ourselves to a meal out in honour of the upcoming anniversary of our wedding, which also happened to take place in the Abbey a good few years ago.

We pulled into the Abbey carpark about 8 pm, and even though we noted on the large number of vehicles, with many differing county registrations, I don’t think we were prepared for the huge crowd that was inside – the place was positively buzzing, and it was just great to see it like that.

Needless to say the patriarch of the Grealy family, Tommy Senior, was on his regular patrols, greeting guests with a quiet word of welcome, as he has done for many a long year now, and we thoroughly enjoyed our visit.

It goes without saying that the meal was excellent (it always is in the Abbey) and hopefully I’ll be back again for the next one (anniversary).

We stopped off in Mikeen’s for a pint on the way home, and we talked about the almost total disappearance of great local characters. 

A few years ago I was going to research a book of characters in the pubs of County Roscommon, but I never got round to it, and I suppose I’ll never do it now.

However, here’s a tale or two of one of our own local characters, who has to be nameless, as thankfully, he’s still with us!

Once upon a time he sold 8 or 10 old ewes to a fellow in Creggs Fair. The pair of them, i.e. the buyer and the seller, spent the day drinking together and as the evening moved on, shillings began to get a bit scarce, and our man hit on an idea.

He asked the buyer would he buy a few more ewes. They went outside to have a look at 8 or 10 more he had in a trailer beside the pub.

Unfortunately, they were the same ones he had already sold and even more unfortunately, the buyer was still sober enough to recognise them, so in this case his plan sadly failed.

He was also a bit unlucky another time when he found a customer for a couple of good heifers, also in the pub, and also at Creggs Fair.

He didn’t have any himself, but, unfazed, he brought the buyer out to a local field where he sold him two prize heifers.

The buyer handed over a substantial price for the animals, and promised he’d be back for them the following day. Once again fortune didn’t favour the brave as the bona-fide owner refused to sell the heifers, and so, heartbroken and dismayed, our hero had to hand back the large sum of money the following day, an act that upset him greatly.

We lamented the disappearance of such characters, or scoundrels, from our countryside, and it’s fair to say that all communities have similarly suffered – maybe I’ll do that book.

And finally…

Two local items to finish with this week. Congrats to Declan Jennings and Helena McDermott, daughter of Oran’s Billy, who got married in the ‘Hodson Bay’ last weekend.

We wish them a long, happy life together, and Billy, you can leave the loaf (a brown one) in Mikeen’s.

Finally for this week, a public meeting to discuss the future of the Creggs Harvest Festival will take place in Kilbegnet Hall on next Friday (21st) night at 10 pm. All are welcome, so please try to be there.

‘Till next week, Bye for now

Great hurling stories – then and now!

 

A long time ago, probably in the late 1970s, the Creggs Junior Hurling team, captained by its founder and probably sole selector, Ollie King, and backboned by such wonderful hurlers as myself and The Rasher, set the hurling world alight and qualified for the County Junior Final, where we came up against our near-neighbours Ballygar.

  In one of the greatest games – that bits a lie – ever seen (by at least 20 lucky supporters) the match ended in a welter of excitement, and the referee declared it a draw, and so it had to go to a replay, which was to take place on the following Sunday week. Unfortunately Creggs Rugby Club had an important league match on that Sunday and as there were six of us involved in both codes, in order to have a team, we had to find six hurlers as quickly as possible.

  The Rasher used his Clare connections, and so on the morning of the replay, as we headed off to Tuam for the rugby match, a well-packed car from Ennis was heading to Creggs. Six members of the very well-known family – the Beirnes from the Mountain – took to the field for that replay, and after another titanic struggle, the cup unfortunately headed off to Ballygar, thanks, if I remember correctly, to a super performance by Kilmore’s Seamus Kelly.

  One of the Beirnes from the Mountain turned out to be a certain Barry Smyth, who happened to be the centre-half back on the Clare senior hurling team of the time, and despite the disappointment of losing the Roscommon Junior Final he later had a very good intercounty career. Anyway, fast-forward to September 28th 2013, and Clare senior hurlers are crowned All-Ireland champions after an epic replay against Cork, and another young Ennis lad, Shane O’Donnell, becomes an overnight sensation and superstar when he scores 3-3 in that match.

  Last Saturday night my nephew Colm and Shane O’Donnell had a joint 21st Birthday Party in Ennis, and I had the pleasure of meeting and having a bit of a chat with the Clare hurler. They are playing Offaly in the qualifiers on next Saturday evening, and Davy Fitz only let him go to his own 21st on the condition that he didn’t drink, which he certainly didn’t, and it once again highlights the extraordinary sacrifices intercounty players have to make nowadays.

  Even though it’s two years since his All-Ireland heroics, the young O’Donnell was in serious demand for photos and selfies, but in fairness to him he handled every request with patience and good grace, and even though he didn’t actually say it, I got the feeling that he was very honoured to be in the company of another great hurler (that was me) who had almost won a Roscommon Junior medal.

  We had a great night in Ennis, and congrats to the two lads – I gave Shane a few tips as to how to improve his game so I look forward to seeing Clare play later on to see if he took my advice on board. Maybe if all goes well for him, Davy Fitz might find a place for me on his management team.

  Talking of management teams, the present Creggs one masterminded one of the great shocks on the local football front when last Saturday evening our lads beat a very strong Castlerea team in the O’Gara Cup by a point, 3-7 to 0-15. Well done to all the players and especially Gerry, the two Johns, and Steven – maybe at last the ghosts of 1983 can be laid to rest.

 

Summer Cabaret…

 

Back to stars and superstars, and in this locality Annette Griffin singer, harpist and TV star is as big as there is, and as I told you last week herself and John Staunton are presenting a Summer Cabaret Dinner & Show every Wednesday evening in the McWilliam Park Hotel, Claremorris, starting on Wednesday, 8th of July.

  There will be music, song, comedy, food and the summer line-up is amazing – Patrick Feeney, Brendan Shine, Tenor Sean Costello, John & Annette, The Riverdance Themed Turley Duggan Dance Academy and the fabulous comedian, Frank Forde, are some of the wonderful artists who will feature every Wednesday, along with the excellent House Band, ‘The McWilliam House Band’.

  The show, which starts at 9 pm (Dinner at 7.15 pm), is suitable for all ages and guarantees an unforgettable night of music, song, and dance. Dinner and show tickets are only €45, while the show itself is €25. Group discounts are available, and after the show you can dance the rest of the night away in Kavanagh’s Bar to the sound of Trevor Moyles. It sounds like a really exciting night out so make sure you hit for Claremorris on any (or every) Wednesday night till the month of September.

 

Palpable grief at

murder of locals

 

Monday morning here in Athlone is usually what I can only describe as fairly mundane and boring – nothing much happens until around midday, and if you get to talk to anyone it’ll be about the weather, the terrible telly programmes that are on during the summer, and, depending on whether or not the other person likes sport, the results of the major games that took place at the weekend.

  Today however, is very different and it is safe to say that Athlone is in a state of shock – the horrific murders of well-known local couple Larry and Martina Hayes in the massacre on the beach in Sousse, Tunisia on Friday, has cast a shadow over the midlands town and there is a palpable sense of grief and sadness all around the place.

  I didn’t know the Hayes family, but I do know Martina’s brother, Billy Kelly, and as I drove into work this morning I heard him being interviewed by Joe Finnegan from Shannonside Radio, and it was distressing to hear the hurt, pain, helplessness and anger in his voice.

  I suppose we look at the News and see all the terrible atrocities that are taking place in the name of some Islamic religion or other, all over the Middle East, and while we might be a bit perturbed, in reality we just shake our heads and think to ourselves “Thank God it’s over there”.

  Well, as and from last Friday that safety net is well and truly gone, and as Billy said this morning these people could literally strike anywhere, and no one anywhere is safe anymore – it’s a chilling thought, but we all now have to live with it.

  It’s ironic to think that any other time the whole town would be buzzing with the unbelieveable victory the Westmeath footballers had on Sunday, when, after well over a hundred years of trying, they finally managed to beat their neighbours Meath in a Senior Football Championship match. However, as laudable an achievement as it is, and any other time it certainly would be, today it doesn’t seem to matter very much, and, I suppose it puts everything into perspective. All I can do is express my sincere sympathy to the Hayes and Kelly families. May Larry and Martina rest in peace.

 

‘Till next week,

Bye for now 

    

Big money, big €5m mess…at least Big Jack cheered us up!

I won’t claim to be an expert on FIFA or world soccer matters, but it’s safe to say that the dogs on the street would have known for many years that the stench of bribery and corruption hung heavily in the air over the soccer world governing body.

  It has long been suspected that the granting of major soccer tournament finals, with the massive financial benefits that accrue to the country that gets them, depended on the size of the brown envelopes that changed hands, and recent events have only served to confirm that suspicion.

  Here at home the FAI have managed to blunder along for years with what almost seems to be a certain degree of farce, with, as they say, the right hand not having a clue what the left hand was doing, and it seems that under the stewardship of John Delaney, nothing has changed.

  The €5m payment that the FAI received from FIFA, as a result of the Thierry Henry ‘handball goal’ in a World Cup qualifier against France in 2009, has sparked worldwide controversy, and indeed led to Enda Kenny describing it as remarkable – and there are certainly a lot of awkward questions to be answered.

  And so, in my opinion, you would expect the Chief Executive to keep his head down, and get ready to sort out the mess that himself and his association now find themselves in – not so with Delaney, as on every newspaper in the country on this Monday morning there he is having a snog with his partner, Emma English, during the Ireland-England soccer international in The Aviva on Sunday afternoon.

  Now, under normal circumstances, giving his girlfriend a kiss (although in my opinion he’s a bit long in the tooth for such a public display of affection) might just be acceptable, but I would have to say it was just a little stupid and unnecessary in the present climate.

  It’s highly likely that the five million payment was properly accounted for, although kept very quiet, but you’d have to wonder did FIFA, under Sepp Blatter, deal with all major problems the same way – i.e. write a cheque and tell the recipients to say nothing and that all would be well?

  Anyway, I’d say we’ll be seeing plenty of Mr. Delaney over the next few weeks and months and it will be interesting to hear what he has to say – I look forward to it all.

 

Big Jack’s back

 

Sticking with soccer for the moment, and everywhere we look we are being reminded of that magic summer 25 years ago, when Big Jack and his band of merry men brought the country on a journey of unbridled joy and craic as they made their way to the last eight in the World Cup of Italia ’90.

  And what a summer it was – the weather was fantastic and we watched the matches in glorious sunshine, drinking pints of cool lager to beat the band, and all the pubs entered into the spirit of the thing by giving away World Cup t-shirts (I still have the Hollywood Bar, Roscommon one), caps, free finger food, and for a full month in June 1990 the country experienced a flat-out summer party.

  Who does not remember the penalty shoot-out against Romania, when David O’Leary, who had been out in the cold for almost three years, after a falling out with Big Jack, scored with his penalty kick, after Packie Bonner had saved from Romania’s Timofte, to put us into the last eight.

  It was the moment that George Hamilton, who was doing the commentary, was to go down in folklore, when he issued the immortal line “The nation holds its breath”, as O’Leary prepared to shoot. On then to play Italy, the host country, in the last eight and history tells us that Toto Schillaci scored the goal that brought an end to one of the most amazing sports odysseys of all time.

  It all came back to me when I saw pictures of Big Jack (Charlton) at the Ireland/England game on Sunday afternoon, and the reception he got from both sets of fans showed how revered he is on each side of the Irish Sea – after all he was a World Cup winner with England in 1966, before having such a successful spell with Ireland in the 1980s and 1990s.

  And yet the suspicion lingers that Charlton didn’t get the best out of what was undoubtedly the best set of players in the history of Irish soccer – his long ball style meant that artists like Liam Brady were often bypassed, and a lot of people believe that we underachieved under Big Jack.

  The other thing that came into my mind was an interview with the late Bill O’Herlihy who said Charlton was a very awkward man to interview, and he felt he (Charlton) was always more accessible and amenable to reporters from England, and the English TV channels. It’s probably definite that Big Jack, being a tough English northerner, was fairly thick in his dealings with the Irish media, and, indeed some of his players, especially Brady and O’Leary, but, thick or not, all of us who were on that month-long party in 1990 will always be grateful to him for giving us something that will never be forgotten.

  Here’s to Italia ’90.

 

Why we should never

abuse GAA players

 

I didn’t set out to write about sport only, but sometimes I wonder about the lengths our county footballers and hurlers are expected to go to when representing their counties as they chase either the Sam Maguire or McCarthy Cups.

  Last week, hurling pundits, analysts and commentators alike, were all united in their criticism of Galway hurling ace Joe Canning, after he had an unusually poor outing in the drawn championship game against Dublin.

  What they made no allowance for at all was that the previous week Joe had picked up a very serious hand injury, which required sixteen stitches, and in my opinion, it’s highly doubtful that he should have played at all.

  It’s no secret that key players like Joe Canning can be rushed back into action for important games, but sometimes it can do more harm than good. As it happens Joe was back to his best on Saturday evening when he scored 2-3 from play in the impressive replay victory over the Dubs.

  However, sometimes I think that we lose sight of the fact that our hurlers and footballers are amateurs, but they are expected to train and behave like professionals, and as supporters we are not inclined to make any allowances at all if a fellow has an off-day.

  The tragic car accident that Galway footballer Shane Walsh was involved in on Friday night, which claimed the life of 55-year-old Tuam taxi driver, Mike Ward, also highlights the fact that our sports stars have the same triumphs and disasters as everyone else, so the next time you feel like abusing your county footballers or hurlers, maybe hold your fire, and realise they too have jobs and families, and if you were more talented and committed to the cause you too could be getting your share of the abuse.

 

And finally…

 

Finally for this week, I’m told that Mick Roarke Senior celebrated his 93rd birthday at the weekend, and he’s as hale and hearty as ever. Congrats Mick, you’re closing in on the President’s cheque.

  ‘Till next week, Bye for now

A story of uplifting human kindness

Human nature being what it is, it’s only normal and natural that on occasion we feel a little bit sorry for ourselves and there are times when we fully believe the whole world and its mother are against us. Nothing but bills seem to come through the postbox, and nowadays the banks and building societies and several other financial institutions can ring people on both their mobile and house phones, at all hours during the day, and you’d be at your wit’s end wondering where to turn.

  Everything seems to be getting more expensive, while private sector wages are showing no sign of even a modest increase and all in all it’s fully understandable when, like the weather, a modest depression settles in and then you see or hear something that makes you realise that you really have no problems at all.

  In the last seven days or so, the story of four-year-old Sebastian from Killaloe, Co. Clare, has shown me (and thousands more like me) that in truth we don’t have it too bad at all. Last Tuesday, Sebastian’s uncle, Kieran, contacted the Ray D’arcy Show on Radio One (RTE Radio), as he wanted help to recreate Christmas for his nephew, who had received the worst possible news after having an MRI scan a week or two ago.

  As a result, because the young lad loved Christmas so much, his parents decided to bring the feast forward by six months and hold it on Saturday 31st May. There were a few things required to make the special day possible, and the reaction as always of the Irish people was just amazing. Eleven helicopters to bring Santa to Killaloe (being out of season, he had to be brought from Finland), fire engines, Garda cars, minions to beat the band and all kind of everything were offered and one seven-year-old even offered their communion money.

  Nothing has ever got such a reaction in the history of RTE Radio and it says a lot for the generosity of the people of Ireland and in fairness to the people of Killaloe, they too entered into the spirit of the whole thing and all put up their Christmas tree lights, to make sure that young Sebastian’s day was the most special day possible. As I say, we may think we have problems, but something like this puts it all into perspective.

Dancing to Denver

Changing subjects entirely (thank God says you), and lightening up the mood, on Saturday night, I found myself at St. Croan’s GAA Club (Ballintubber and Ballymoe), fundraising dance in the Hub in Castlerea, where my favourite band of all time, the Mike Denver Band, were putting on their usual, wonderful musical performance.

  Before I hit the Hub, I called into Mulvihill’s Lounge in Castlerea, where I met up with the legend that is Danny Burke and in the course of a couple of quite pints, he brought me back to my days many years ago in the local branch of the Bank of Ireland. Thirty-six years ago, Johnny O’Hara retired from his job as porter in the aforementioned bank and I can still remember him being replaced by the young fresh-faced, Seamie Moran.

  Seamie is still as fresh-faced and as young looking as he was in 1979 and this week he retired after putting in all those years’ service with the bank. A big retirement do was held for him, also in Mulvihill’s on Friday night, and I’m told a large number of past and present Bank of Ireland officials turned up. Best wishes in the future Seamie and well done on such a long career in the bank. As it happens, the Creggs connection is still as strong as ever (well, maybe a bit stronger) as the present manager in the branch in the Square is our own neighbour, and long-time friend, Sean Beirne – and he tells me he’s mad to throw out a few euro.

  Anyway, back to the Hub and of course the drummer on Mike’s band is none other than Seamie’s first cousin, Castlerea’s one and only Sean (Bozo) Moran and it must have been great for him to play to such a huge crowd in his own home town. For a change I didn’t get to have a word with Bozo but I won’t have to wait too long as I see they’re playing at the Race Dance in Roscommon in The Abbey Hotel on next Monday, June 8th. If you’re free, go along, it will certainly be worth your while. Tell Joe Finnegan I sent you! I met many familiar faces in The Hub on Saturday night, including Johan Hayden, a long-time follower of the karaoke king, Michael Holland senior and junior, Mike Smyth (formerly of the Don Arms) and his wife Majella and many more whom I won’t embarrass by mentioning.

  It’s an amazing GAA club, who were only recently playing in the All-Ireland Intermediate Club final, and to put on such a big event takes an enormous community effort. Well done to all concerned and I thoroughly enjoyed my visit. I didn’t win the best jiver award on the night, but maybe I was gone before the winner was announced (I’m only joking! There was no such competition!)

 

The price isn’t right

 

It’s now Monday evening, and today I was at the Creggs versus Pearses Junior A Championship game, which was played in the most appalling conditions that I have ever seen. Why it had to be played on a Bank Holiday Monday I don’t know, but it didn’t make a lot of sense as everyone had to go back to work straight away after the game and I also have to say that €10 into a single junior football game is a bit excessive.

  A neighbour of mine told me during the game that, for €20, he has a stand ticket at the upcoming World Cup soccer qualifier against Scotland in the Aviva Stadium and his young son has a schoolboys ticket for €10. I know I’ll be accused of being anti-GAA, but nothing could be further from the truth. I have always been a GAA man and have been involved both as a player and a supporter since I was a child! I just think €10 is a bit pricey for a Junior football game.

  The problem of the Leaving Cert exam is also a big one, particularly for small rural clubs, and I just wonder could some of these fixtures not be put back till the Leaving Cert is over. As manager of last year’s Creggs team, I can tell you we had any amount of summer weekends where we had no game at all.

And finally…

 

Finally for this week, I wish to congratulate my own daughter, Tara, who had a very successful weekend jumping Crosswell Blue, at Mullingar International Show, which is one of the best and biggest equestrian facilities in the country and where Tara and Blue did us proud. Well done to both. ‘Til next week, Bye for now

A story of uplifting human kindness

 

Human nature being what it is, it’s only normal and natural that on occasion we feel a little bit sorry for ourselves and there are times when we fully believe the whole world and its mother are against us.

  Nothing but bills seem to come through the postbox, and nowadays the banks and building societies and several other financial institutions can ring people on both their mobile and house phones, at all hours during the day, and you’d be at your wit’s end wondering where to turn.

  Everything seems to be getting more expensive, while private sector wages are showing no sign of even a modest increase and all in all it’s fully understandable when, like the weather, a modest depression settles in and then you see or hear something that makes you realise that you really have no problems at all. In the last seven days or so, the story of four-year-old Sebastian from Killaloe, Co. Clare, has shown me (and thousands more like me) that in truth we don’t have it too bad at all.

  Last Tuesday, Sebastian’s uncle, Kieran, contacted the Ray D’arcy Show on Radio One (RTE Radio), as he wanted help to recreate Christmas for his nephew, who had received the worst possible news after having an MRI scan a week or two ago. As a result, because the young lad loved Christmas so much, his parents decided to bring the feast forward by six months and hold it on Saturday 31st May. There were a few things required to make the special day possible, and the reaction as always of the Irish people was just amazing.

  Eleven helicopters to bring Santa to Killaloe (being out of season, he had to be brought from Finland), fire engines, Garda cars, minions to beat the band and all kind of everything were offered and one seven-year-old even offered their communion money.

  Nothing has ever got such a reaction in the history of RTE Radio and it says a lot for the generosity of the people of Ireland and in fairness to the people of Killaloe, they too entered into the spirit of the whole thing and all put up their Christmas tree lights, to make sure that young Sebastian’s day was the most special day possible.

  As I say, we may think we have problems, but something like this puts it all into perspective.

           

Dancing to Denver

 

Changing subjects entirely (thank God says you), and lightening up the mood, on Saturday night, I found myself at St. Croan’s GAA Club (Ballintubber and Ballymoe), fundraising dance in the Hub in Castlerea, where my favourite band of all time, the Mike Denver Band, were putting on their usual, wonderful musical performance.

  Before I hit the Hub, I called into Mulvihill’s Lounge in Castlerea, where I met up with the legend that is Danny Burke and in the course of a couple of quite pints, he brought me back to my days many years ago in the local branch of the Bank of Ireland.

            Thirty-six years ago, Johnny O’Hara retired from his job as porter in the aforementioned bank and I can still remember him being replaced by the young fresh-faced, Seamie Moran. Seamie is still as fresh-faced and as young looking as he was in 1979 and this week he retired after putting in all those years’ service with the bank. A big retirement do was held for him, also in Mulvihill’s on Friday night, and I’m told a large number of past and present Bank of Ireland officials turned up. Best wishes in the future Seamie and well done on such a long career in the bank.

            As it happens, the Creggs connection is still as strong as ever (well, maybe a bit stronger) as the present manager in the branch in the Square is our own neighbour, and long-time friend, Sean Beirne – and he tells me he’s mad to throw out a few euro.

            Anyway, back to the Hub and of course the drummer on Mike’s band is none other than Seamie’s first cousin, Castlerea’s one and only Sean (Bozo) Moran and it must have been great for him to play to such a huge crowd in his own home town. For a change I didn’t get to have a word with Bozo but I won’t have to wait too long as I see they’re playing at the Race Dance in Roscommon in The Abbey Hotel on next Monday, June 8th. If you’re free, go along, it will certainly be worth your while. Tell Joe Finnegan I sent you!

  I met many familiar faces in The Hub on Saturday night, including Johan Hayden, a long-time follower of the karaoke king, Michael Holland senior and junior, Mike Smyth (formerly of the Don Arms) and his wife Majella and many more whom I won’t embarrass by mentioning. It’s an amazing GAA club, who were only recently playing in the All-Ireland Intermediate Club final, and to put on such a big event takes an enormous community effort.

  Well done to all concerned and I thoroughly enjoyed my visit. I didn’t win the best jiver award on the night, but maybe I was gone before the winner was announced (I’m only joking! There was no such competition!)

           

The price isn’t right

 

It’s now Monday evening, and today I was at the Creggs versus Pearses Junior A Championship game, which was played in the most appalling conditions that I have ever seen.

  Why it had to be played on a Bank Holiday Monday I don’t know, but it didn’t make a lot of sense as everyone had to go back to work straight away after the game and I also have to say that €10 into a single junior football game is a bit excessive.

  A neighbour of mine told me during the game that, for €20, he has a stand ticket at the upcoming World Cup soccer qualifier against Scotland in the Aviva Stadium and his young son has a schoolboys ticket for €10. I know I’ll be accused of being anti-GAA, but nothing could be further from the truth. I have always been a GAA man and have been involved both as a player and a supporter since I was a child! I just think €10 is a bit pricey for a Junior football game.

  The problem of the Leaving Cert exam is also a big one, particularly for small rural clubs, and I just wonder could some of these fixtures not be put back till the Leaving Cert is over. As manager of last year’s Creggs team, I can tell you we had any amount of summer weekends where we had no game at all.

 

           

And finally…

 

Finally for this week, I wish to congratulate my own daughter, Tara, who had a very successful weekend jumping Crosswell Blue, at Mullingar International Show, which is one of the best and biggest equestrian facilities in the country and where Tara and Blue did us proud. Well done to both.

 

‘Til next week,

Bye for now

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